Simple equality operator (==)

Value1 == Value2

Value1

The first value to compare.

Value2

The second value to compare.

Returns — Logical

Whether the first value is equal to the second value.

Returns whether the first value is equal to the second value. 2 == 32 == 3 returns FALSE, but 2 == 22 == 2 returns TRUE. "a" == "A""a" == "A" returns FALSE, because text string comparisons are case-sensitive (unlike the = operator, where text string comparisons are case-insensitive.)

Array behavior

When applied to arrays, this operator returns a single TRUE or FALSE value indicating whether their elements are identical.

This formula returns TRUE:

{ 2, 2 } == { 2, 2 }{ 2; 2 } == { 2; 2 }

This formula returns FALSE:

{ 2, 2 } == { 2, 3 }{ 2; 2 } == { 2; 3 }

The = operator works differently. This formula returns the array { TRUE, TRUE }{ TRUE; TRUE }:

{ 2, 2 } = { 2, 2 }{ 2; 2 } = { 2; 2 }

This formula returns the array { TRUE, FALSE }{ TRUE; FALSE }:

{ 2, 2 } = { 2, 3 }{ 2; 2 } = { 2; 3 }

The behavior of the = operator is useful particularly when used with the FILTER function. Refer to the = documentation for more information.

Examples

2 == 32 == 3

Returns FALSE.

2 == 22 == 2

Returns TRUE.

"a" == "A""a" == "A"

Returns FALSE. Text string comparisons are case-sensitive.

"a" = "A""a" = "A"

Returns TRUE, as the = operator compares text strings in a case-insensitive manner.

"a" == "a""a" == "a"

Returns TRUE. Text string comparisons are case-sensitive.

{ 2, 2 } = { 2, 2 }{ 2; 2 } = { 2; 2 }

Returns TRUE, because all pairs in the two arrays are equal to one another.

{ 2, 2 } = { 2, 3 }{ 2; 2 } = { 2; 3 }

Returns FALSE, because not all pairs in the two arrays are equal to one another.